The Vast Fields of Ordinary by Nick Burd

Book cover of The Vast Field of OrdinaryThe Vast Fields of Ordinary
by Nick Burd
Published on: May 1st, 2009

From Goodreads:

It’s Dade’s last summer at home, and things are pretty hopeless. He has a crappy job, a “boyfriend” who treats him like dirt, and his parents’ marriage is falling apart. So when he meets and falls in love with the mysterious Alex Kincaid, Dade feels like he’s finally experiencing true happiness. But when a tragedy shatters the final days of summer, he realizes he must face his future and learn how to move forward from his past.

My thoughts:

I read this book a year back. Yup. Long, long time. But just couldn’t get around to talking about it because I tend to lose my coherence when I end up liking something (which, I understand, is a terrible thing to admit on a book blog but whattodo!).

This book is one of my brother’s favourites (the kind that he re-read so much that he actually lost count of how many times he has read it) and he gave it to me at this time last year when I had no idea what I was doing with my life and made the impulsive decision to shift from Calcutta to New Delhi again.

Anyway. I moved to ND almost empty-handed (in terms of books, really) save for this. And thank god for that. What an ache-y, sensitive, beautiful book this was.

I believe the true test of a book lies in holding your attention and making you feel, really feel, when you’ve shut yourself from the rest of the world and kind of hit rock bottom. Everything stops mattering at this point. And if a book ends up mattering, well, you can guess how good a book that must be,

This is an extremely well-written book, exploring that time between high school and college when everything around you is changing and you are not quite sure if you want it to or maybe you’re just torn between wanting it to and not wanting it to. Dade is at that point, wanting to leave high school and his town behind but not quite sure how to, especially when he falls in love with the strangely alluring Alex Kincaid (fictional crush alert, yup). This is a book about relationships, complicated relationships – between divorcing parents, between parents and children with secret lives, between lovers and ex lovers, and it’s all very sensitively handled. It’s a book with a big heart and it’s essentially a bite of a-few-days-in-the-life-of-a-gay-teenager. And it’s done beautifully. And that makes all the difference.

I don’t know if Nick Burd has written any more books. I haven’t come across any more but I wish he does, because I would read it. He is immensely talented. It takes a deft hand to make the everyday so beautiful and significant.

Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour

Everything Leads to You
by Nina LaCour
Published: May 15, 2014

From Goodreads:

A love letter to the craft and romance of film and fate in front of—and behind—the camera from the award-winning author ofHold Still. A wunderkind young set designer, Emi has already started to find her way in the competitive Hollywood film world. Emi is a film buff and a true romantic, but her real-life relationships are a mess. She has desperately gone back to the same girl too many times to mention. But then a mysterious letter from a silver screen legend leads Emi to Ava. Ava is unlike anyone Emi has ever met. She has a tumultuous, not-so-glamorous past, and lives an unconventional life. She’s enigmatic…. She’s beautiful. And she is about to expand Emi’s understanding of family, acceptance, and true romance.

My thoughts:

I’ve wanted to read a Nina LaCour novel for so long. I have Hold Still and The Disenchantments on my phone but somehow, life, ugh, and other books, hmmm, keep getting in the way. Thankfully, Everything Leads to You was a supersmooth ride and I had so much fun reading it and nowihavetoreadeverythingelsebyherYES.

I loved the Hollywood setting. I loved that there wasn’t the usual glitz and glamour you generally associate with the industry and all, because this is just regular people going about making a movie. And then our main character is a set designer, which I thought was the coolest nonclichedjobinabooksetinHollywoodEver. I don’t know how authentic the Hollywood setting was since I’ve, obviously, never been there, but it felt so real. No jarring edges and jagged ends, the plot fit in smoothly with the setting, the mystery and romance angles taking themselves along into the mix. It was a good book.

The characters were so well fleshed out and I’m not just talking about the two leads. I’m talking about EVERYONEOFTHEM – a certain someone’s certain ex, a random old couple who could just be passing through in the book but are equipped with such good moments that I remember them even months after reading the book.

The only complaint I’d have is to do with the romance, because there’s not much of that – but there are fantastic friendship portrayals and a perfect little Hollywood mystery and it’s the kind of book that throws you into quick-read mode (I read this in 3-4 metro rides; Yes, I read all my books on the metro these days. I’ve become one of those people) and it was good. It’s a one time read but a good one time read.

It’ll engross you and leave you with a smile.

Quite perfect for the summer.

All the Rage by Courtney Summers

All the Rage
by Courtney Summers
Release date: April 14th, 2015

From Goodreads:

The sheriff’s son, Kellan Turner, is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is, and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. Because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town, the truth about him has cost her everything—friends, family, and her community. Branded a liar and bullied relentlessly by a group of kids she used to hang out with, Romy’s only refuge is the diner where she works outside of town. No one knows her name or her past there; she can finally be anonymous. But when a girl with ties to both Romy and Kellan goes missing after a party, and news of him assaulting another girl in a town close by gets out, Romy must decide whether she wants to fight or carry the burden of knowing more girls could get hurt if she doesn’t speak up. Nobody believed her the first time—and they certainly won’t now — but the cost of her silence might be more than she can bear.

With a shocking conclusion and writing that will absolutely knock you out, All the Rage examines the shame and silence inflicted upon young women after an act of sexual violence, forcing us to ask ourselves: In a culture that refuses to protect its young girls, how can they survive?

My thoughts:

I read this in two sittings. On my way to work, and back. There was an 8 hour interval in between, because, you know, work – which almost killed me because HOLY CHRIST THIS BOOK. 
I love Courtney Summers. She is fucking fabulous. The things that Some Girls Are did to me, oh gosh, I can’t even gush enough. And Cracked Up To Be. My brother and I still debate over which we think is better. (We still haven’t come to a conclusion)
And then This. All The RageALL THE RAGE. This book is everything that Cracked Up To Be and Some Girls Are built up to. It’s like both those books actually were leading up to this. The running themes of sexual-assault, rape-culture, victim-blaming, slut-slamming – everything culminates in here and wow. 

I have to say, I don’t think the blurb does the book much justice. It appears too straightforward, when really, the devil’s in the details. Courtney Summers is such a brilliant writer. Her minimalist style is like poetry. She doesn’t tell, she casts shadows and in the shadows of what isn’t told, you get the chills.

I don’t know how to sound cohesive about this. It’s such an explosion of a book. And it talks of all the things that surround us all the fucking time but which we conveniently choose to ignore., because, hushmychildspeaknoevil.

In many ways, All The Rage reminded me of Fury by Australian author Shirley Mar, which is one of the best books I’ve read. I felt the same surge of anger and helplessness as I had felt when I’d read Fury some 4 years back. The rage. Yes, the rage is the unspoken kind, the one that bubbles just beneath the surface for months and years till it spills over. It’s such an universal rage against the way girls are treated in this world, at every fucking step, that lewd whisper in your ear as you go shopping or that silent eye-undressing that happens everysingleday – I thought I would burst because there finally was a book that gave language to that. (Living in a country that doesn’t recognize marital rape as a criminal offense and takes pains to victim-slam before arresting rapists, such rage is an everyday story.)

So I would like to thank Courtney Summers for writing this book, for putting it out there, for making people think about the very things they quickly sweep under the carpet after a furtive glance around, for the rage.

I wish every teenage girl could be given this book. Every one of them. Before they are silenced.

I’ll Give You The Sun by Jandy Nelson

Book cover of I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy NelsonI’ll Give You the Sun
by Jandy Nelson
Release date: September 16, 2014

From Goodreads:

At first, Jude and her twin brother Noah, are inseparable. Noah draws constantly and is falling in love with the charismatic boy next door, while daredevil Jude wears red-red lipstick, cliff-dives, and does all the talking for both of them. Years later, they are barely speaking. Something has happened to change the twins in different yet equally devastating ways . . . but then Jude meets an intriguing, irresistible boy and a mysterious new mentor. The early years are Noah’s to tell; the later years are Jude’s. But they each have only half the story, and if they can only find their way back to one another, they’ll have a chance to remake their world. This radiant, award-winning novel from the acclaimed author of The Sky Is Everywhere will leave you breathless and teary and laughing—often all at once.

My thoughts:

Jandy Nelson’s The Sky is Everywhere has been one of those books that don’t quite leave my mind when  I’m thinking of books that have stayed with me. Sometimes when people debut with such memorable books, most follow-up works don’t quite match up. Sometimes that happens. And sometimes that doesn’t. Sometimes it only gets better.

Jandy Nelson is a magician. I want to write that across the skies. JANDY NELSON IS A MAGICIAN.

I’ll Give You the Sun  is the kind of book that made me want to climb out of earth and bring the sun for her, because SoMuchBrilliance. This book is a stunner of a read. The writing is gorgeous, so gorgeous I felt like I was drowning in it. Although, yes, I do admit it might not be the kind of writing that everybody will like. If you didn’t like the prose-style of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, erhm, you should maybe just read a sampler of this to see if it’s your thing and go ahead, because if you’re going by this review, HOLY YES, I WANTED TO EAT THE BOOK. (This happened with The Sky is Everywhere as well, but it happened double-times with this)

So much of the feels. So much of it that feels isn’t even the right word. So much of the feels and this is why:

  • Siblings. Can there pleaaaaaase be more books about siblings? And siblings who aren’t trying to kill each other and aren’t just hanging around the background scenes just so they could be there but real-life, living, breathing siblings that have that pull which is the thing about siblings anyway (which is also why I loved Imaginary Girls so much *breathes heavily*). Noah and Jude are more like NoahAndJude and Jandy Nelson doesn’t just tell you, she shows you how. It’s brilliant how she managed the dual perspective throughout the book, giving the two of them such distinct voices that you don’t have to go check the chapter head to see whose portion you’re reading, yet you just know that these two are two sides of the same coin. Throw brother and sister and love and art and jealousy and guilt and love and more love and you will get NoahAndJude.
  • Family. The family you want to run away from and return to. The family that isn’t just the people that are alive but the ones who’ve died and are still there because you decide if you want to keep them there or let them go. Yup, Jandy Nelson nails that. (PS. For ghosts and other such things that you-don’t-really-see-happening-around-you-because-you-don’t-notice, I’ll Give You the Sun often reads like magic realism and even though it’s not the specified genre, I’m starting to think, maybe it is.)
  • Art. ‘What is bad for the heart is good for art‘ is something one of the characters says in the book (I won’t say who because I don’t want to give away anything), and that is more or less the basis of all great art in this book. It captures the essence of the artist so well, I had to stop for breath (which was difficult, considering that I read most of the book on the metro, on the way to and back from work, and the metro is at that time so crowded that it hardly leaves you space to stand, let alone, stand and read). You get how the description of such art comes from the soul, because the author apparently wrote this book over three years, shutting herself in darkened rooms, with just the light from the laptop giving her company, because things like that come from, I don’t know, somewhere within, and when you read or see the book or the sculpture or the painting, you can feel where it comes from.
  • Love. Oh man. The Beatles probably wrote All You Need Is Love for Jandy Nelson to write this book. Love spills from the spine of this book. There is not a single person who hasn’t been affected by love here. All kinds of love. ALL KINDS.
  • Romance. I could have clubbed this with Love but there’s so much of Love already, I realised this kind of needed highlighting of its own. And What Happens With Noah is probably my favourite Romantic Story of the Year.
  • The Ones Who’ve Died and are Still Around, Like Really, Because (you remember how Sirius Black said that The Ones That Love Us Never Really leave Us) They Don’t Have To Be Ghosts, you see.
  • Metaphors. I like metaphors, okay? Don’t judge.
  • Title. I officially think this is the Coolest Title of the Year.
  • I got lost in this book. Like, literally. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve walked into the wrong metro because of this book. Oh yes.
Just read the book, okay? I don’t know what else to say. I’m bursting with words and I feel like I’m coming up short and stupid and I just want everyone in this world to read this book because it’s that good. Yes, that good.

 

A Note of Madness by Tabitha Suzuma

There really is no better way of dealing with the jolts life sends you than to disappear in a book. Just when I think that nothing perhaps could make things better, books prove me wrong. Over and over again. This happens often.
 
I won this book via a giveaway on the author’s Facebook page, a long time ago. A reaaally long time ago. I loved Tabitha Suzuma‘s Forbidden. Even now I’d consider it one of the most powerful books I’ve read (just so you know, I read Forbidden four years ago). Somehow, though – whether it was life or university or other books – I never got around to reading A Note of Madness
 
On Wednesday, I was rummaging my shelves for something to read. There’s always too much to read. My shelves are spilling and I always have to look for newer places around the house to make room for my books. A lot of those books are unread, not because I didn’t want to read them, but because other books came along and then even more books. My copy of A Note of Madness was signed ‘August 2010’ with a message from the author. Once I picked it up, I couldn’t let it go.

 

From Goodreads:

Life as a student is good for Flynn. As one of the top pianists at the Royal College of Music, he has been put forward for an important concert, the opportunity of a lifetime. But beneath the surface, things are changing. On a good day he feels full of energy and life, but on a bad day being alive is worse than being dead. Sometimes he wants to compose and practice all night, at other times he can’t get out of bed. With the pressure of the forthcoming concert and the growing concern of his family and friends, emotions come to a head. Sometimes things can only get worse before they get better.

 
My thoughts:
In the last few months, I’ve lost count of the number of times I thought I was going mad. It happened with increasing frequency and I kept thinking it would get better but it didn’t, not then. It’s hard to define madness. It’s an easy step-over from sanity. I think it happens to everyone, at least once in our lives. Flynn’s madness pushes him over, way over the edge. And the whole spiralling-downwards experience is what the book chronicles. There are no minced words, no twists and turns, it’s probably the most straight-cut book I’ve read. Flynn loses his mind and how.
 
After I read Forbidden, I had an overwhelming urge to connect with the author. The book had such a huge impact on me, I had to tell her. We befriended over Facebook, and yes, if you know her, you would know how she has battled (and still battles) mental illness. She is very vocal about it and I think that’s important because nobody really talks about it. A Note of Madness was her debut novel and you get it, you know. You get the fact that the author knows what she is talking about because you get into Flynn’s head, ride the highs and lows with him and feel the crippling fear that makes it impossible to go on and do anything, even though the book is written in third person and you’re just supposed to feel objective about it. 
 
It’s an atmosphere of paranoia. Flynn’s, his family’s, his friends’. Sometimes you’d want to shut the book, just so you could breathe. It’s not an easy read, of course. But it’s good, it’s really good. 
 
After Robin Williams’ suicide, when everybody was talking about depression, Ms Suzuma shared this post on Facebook. It talks about her family’s fight with the disease. I think you should take a look.
 
I think the book has a most apt cover. The blackness, the boy at the edge, the title placement – I think it’s one of my favourites now.

Revenge Wears Prada

Revenge Wears Prada
by Lauren Weisberger
Release date: June 4, ’13
From Goodreads:

The sequel you’ve been waiting for: the follow-up to the sensational #1 bestseller The Devil Wears Prada.
Almost a decade has passed since Andy Sachs quit the job “a million girls would die for” working for Miranda Priestly at Runway magazine—a dream that turned out to be a nightmare. Andy and Emily, her former nemesis and co-assistant, have since joined forces to start a highend bridal magazine. The Plunge has quickly become required reading for the young and stylish. Now they get to call all the shots: Andy writes and travels to her heart’s content; Emily plans parties and secures advertising like a seasoned pro. Even better, Andy has met the love of her life. Max Harrison, scion of a storied media family, is confident, successful, and drop-dead gorgeous. Their wedding will be splashed across all the society pages as their friends and family gather to toast the glowing couple. Andy Sachs is on top of the world. But karma’s a bitch. The morning of her wedding, Andy can’t shake the past. And when she discovers a secret letter with crushing implications, her wedding-day jitters turn to cold dread. Andy realizes that nothing—not her husband, nor her beloved career—is as it seems. She never suspected that her efforts to build a bright new life would lead her back to the darkness she barely escaped ten years ago—and directly into the path of the devil herself.

A word about the cover: Unlike the hardcover, the paperback keeps with the shoe theme of all of Weisberger’s books. If not for the trident heel or the fact that this a Devil Wears Prada sequel, I’d probably glance over.

My thoughts:

Okay, so let me be clear: I haven’t read the Devil Wears Prada. I’ve read Weisberger’s other books, but not Devil. I’ve watched the film uncountable times but yes, I realise that there were things in the film that were different from the book, so I’m not going to draw comparisons between Revenge and Devil.

Let’s treat Revenge as a standalone. where I know the back stories of the characters. Happens, right?

By itself, I thought Revenge was entertaining. I’m not exactly a fan of Weisberger’s but Revenge had my attention throughout. Oh, of course, it starts off with Andy being crazy, making a mountain out of a molehill, that really makes no sense at all, but maybe, just maybe, that could have been a foreshadowing of things to come.

So it’s been 10 years since Andy left the ‘Runway’ and instead of writing for The New Yorker or something, she runs a super-successful luxury wedding magazine, along with – surprise!surprise! – Emily, Miranda Priestly’s former first assistant and you know, just the girl who couldn’t stand Andy earlier. Yes, 10 years do change a lot of things. Which also means that there’s a new guy (husband, actually), Max, who is as close to perfect as men can be. Except, of course, for the things Andy find right before her wedding that send her taking a ride across loonville through the first half of the book. I’m thinking Andy may just be a little too paranoid than necessary and hence the pointless jumping-to-conclusions take up the early part of the book. I mean, she had a pretty good domestic and professional life otherwise.

Until, of course, Miranda comes into the picture. Well, she isn’t physically present much of the time that she was in Devil, but she’s here alright. In Andy’s nightmares and hey, the magazine world. There are actually more moments of perfect domesticity than Miranda-tornadoes. It was pacey. At least till the last 30% of the book when almost everything takes a whole hey-i-didn’t-think-that-would-happen turn.

So all of Goodreads has been exploding with how Weisberger completely dashes the ‘American Dream’ in this book. I’m not sure that’s a valid criticism. So, yes, the end picture isn’t pretty, but hey, life isn’t always rosy, is it? There’s hope and that’s important. Revenge, too, has hope. If you plan on going into this book with a critical eye, you won’t be doing yourself any favours. Read it like you would treat a summer fling. It’s fun. Revenges always are.

Have you read either Devil or Revenge?

 

Lola and the Boy Next Door

(Yes, the whole world’s probably read it by now, but GAHH I’m going to talk about it anyway, because, hey, Stephanie Perkins. Enough said.)

Lola and the Boy Next Door
by Stephanie Perkins
Release date: September 28th, ’11
From Goodreads:

Budding designer Lola Nolan doesn’t believe in fashion…she believes in costume. The more expressive the outfit–more sparkly, more fun, more wild–the better. But even though Lola’s style is outrageous, she’s a devoted daughter and friend with some big plans for the future. And everything is pretty perfect (right down to her hot rocker boyfriend) until the dreaded Bell twins, Calliope and Cricket, return to the neighborhood.
When Cricket–a gifted inventor–steps out from his twin sister’s shadow and back into Lola’s life, she must finally reconcile a lifetime of feelings for the boy next door.

A word about the cover: I love the wig. And the cover in general coveys the same cheeriness that Anna‘s cover does, although the latter had a mysteriousness about it since you couldn’t see the guy’s face on it and hey, we had a good time imagining Etienne, didn’t we? But Lola has a new cover, too (like all the books in this series) – more city-centric – and I think it’s gorgeous. Also, mature.

My thoughts:

This book is a big glob of happiness. I mean, there are a lot of sad and not-so-kind and heartbreaking stuff, too, but overall, it’s such a happy book it makes you feel hopeful about things, irrespective of how you’re feeling.

It’s been a few hours since I finished reading this book and I still can’t stop grinning about it. Stephanie Perkins knows, you know. She REALLY knows how to write a good, believable romance. She knows how to build up a believable friendship-that-is-more-than-just-friendship and turn it on its head so that even though you kind of know that in spite of everything this will end up with a happy ending, you can’t discard the book with a smirk because the characters are sitting there with your heart and you’re squealing and gahh-ing over whatever’s happening and you know you need this.

Yes, that’s what a Stephanie Perkins book feels like. And that’s what Lola and the Boy Next Door feels like, too.

I’ve heard a lot of people didn’t really like Lola’s dangling-two-boys act but c’mon, she’s only human and nobody’s perfect. Oh, well, Cricket is. Like reallyreallyreally perfect. Dude, where do guys like him live? (Okay, okay, I know San Francisco and all that, but really) Remember Etienne from Anna ? Yeah, that guy is puurrrfect, but Cricket is sometimes (most times, actually) waaaay too good to be true.

Other things I liked about Lola:
– Lola’s dads! I haven’t read a better, matter-of-fact, un-caricatured representation of a gay couple with a daughter. And Andy and Nathan stand out so well against each other.
– Norah. (I’m not saying who she is if you haven’t read the book – although chances are that you have, still – but I thought she was the most interesting character in the book)
– An obsessive-compulsive costume designer. An Olympic-bound figure skater. An inventor. Aahh, unique hobbies make for such unique characters.
– Also, the thing about Alexander Graham Bell. I liked that bit of inclusion.
– I loved the little unconventional bits the book had. Like Lola’s 5-years-older boyfriend. The biological/adopted family thingy. Heck, the costumes! Less high school, more home scenes (hey, the boy’s just next door – who would even *want* school?) – infact, more COLLEGE (here’s looking at you Berkeley) than high school.
– But my favourite part? ANNA AND ST. CLAIR MAKE APPEARANCES THROUGHOUT THE BOOK.

Okay, so Anna is still one of my favouritebooksEVER. It’s one of the most glorious books written in YA fiction and bringing Lola up for a comparison would just not be fair because Anna is, you know, Anna. Boarding school. Paris. St Clair. Perfection.

But Lola IS a good read. More than good, it’s a happy read and we can all do with a heavy dose of happiness, can’t we? This book had been on my to-read list for a very long time but I’m overjoyed I finally could get around to reading it because the reading experience has been worth more than I had expected. I’m convinced now. Stephanie Perkins has the gift of writing happy. You know that when you’re feeling the blues, all you need is to pick up a Perkins book. Works like magic.

Do you like Anna or Lola better?